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ponedeljek, 17 januarja, 2022

Attacks on Catholicism in Poland intensify

By: V4 Agency

According to a recent report, the number of young people in Poland who consider themselves religious has dropped significantly. This trend may be reinforced by the increasing frequency of attacks on Christians and Christian symbols.

Attacks on the Catholic Church and churches have multiplied in Poland recently, driven mainly by atheist activists and “common” criminals, medianarodowe.com writes. As they recall, churches are increasingly being looted, damaged or set on fire throughout the country.

On Wednesday, two raging drunk men rampaged the historic monument-listed church in Rzeszow, reportedly nearly destroying the interior.

A resident in the area related to Nowiny24 hearing commotion, hollering, upturning of pews, smashing of windows and ringing of the bells coming from inside the church. Many people heard the noise and notified the parish priest, who rushed to the church “alarmed.” The two young men ravaging inside reportedly verbally insulted the priest and then beat him.

According to reports the intruders also damaged the altar, and caused significant, partly irreparable damage to the church interior.

A week ago, the Polish press reported that a 34-year-old woman had attempted to burn down the Church of the Holy Cross in Lublin. Although the fire was quickly extinguished, significant damage occurred.

The perpetrator was arrested and could face several years in prison, however, Polish court rulings do not necessarily fall in line with public opinion, especially as regards attacks on Catholicism and thereby another’s religious feelings.

For example, the three LGBTQ activists who put up posters of the revered Black Madonna of Czestochowa affixed with the homosexual movement rainbow as the halo in local churches were acquitted in the first instance. Polish bishops expressed their disagreement with the verdict.

According to a survey, the attitude of Poles towards the Catholic religion is changing. Although nearly 92 per cent of them profess to be Catholic, religiosity among young people has fallen to half over the past few decades.

The findings of a report by the Polish Catholic News Agency (KAI) published on Friday also seem to be supported by the series of pro-abortion protests that have been framing public discourse domestically for months and whose activists have repeatedly corrupted or insulted Christian religious symbols.

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