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petek, 3 decembra, 2021

Slovenian prosecution and the spirit of the immortal Višinski

By: Bogdan Sajovic

The term “dog that should be liquidated” is not necessarily a serious threat. At least that is the opinion of the state prosecutor Klementina Prejac, who rejected the indictment against a certain Alojz Breznik, who, some time ago, wrote on his website that the Minister of the Interior Aleš Hojs is “a dog that should be liquidated”.

According to the prosecutor, this does not pose a serious enough threat. Additionally, it could be seen from the implementation of the prosecutor that Breznik was frustrated and upset by the actions of the government, of which Hojs is a member, and therefore reacted accordingly. In laymen terms, Hojs is to blame, because he is a member of the government and a political option that Breznik does not like. Well, the judiciary did not have a similar understanding in the case when Vili Kovačič alias “Citizen K.” cursed his agitation and dissatisfaction with the verdict of a judge. Kovačič was promptly dragged through the courts and convicted. The judiciary does not even understand the agitation over the nebulae that Tanja Fajon spreads richly on online networks, but it persecutes people who reacted negatively to Fajon’s nonsense, moreover, it persecutes those who did not write the negative reaction themselves, but just “retweeted” it. This means that the right to disturb in our dear homeland is very selective. If someone is upset about the moves of left wing politics, it is worth prosecuting, but if it is upset about right wing, this should be treated with understanding. Otherwise, the father of Soviet justice, Andrej Višinski, often used the phrase “shoot the rabid dogs” at trials of political opponents. After 1945, the bright theories and practices of the Soviet judiciary were successfully implemented in our places as well, where they have apparently survived to the present day. Therefore, we should not be surprised that the phrase “a dog that should be liquidated” is not controversial for the Slovenian judiciary, if of course it is directed in the direction outlined by the immortal Višinski…

Bogdan Sajovic is a journalist of the magazine Demokracija.

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