What kind of dictatorship is this really? Featured

  • Written by  Gašper Blažič
  • Comments:DISQUS_COMMENTS
Gašper Blažič. (Photo: Demokracija) Gašper Blažič. (Photo: Demokracija)

In recent weeks, although I have been on holiday, I have been closely following developments in Slovenia. The former "political cyclists" got off their bikes, masked members of the terrorist organization Antifa came to light, and tasteless provocations and even insults to members of the Slovenian Armed Forces continued. And as a "dessert", the NPU action followed, which was announced between the lines by the infamous already former criminalist Drago Kos: Deputy Prime Minister Zdravko Počivalšek was detained, while Interior Minister Aleš Hojs resigned.

So there are no more doubts: Slovenia will indeed mark thirty years of statehood next year, but it is internally unfree and still involved in the continuity of the rule of the political underworld. With all this, it is interesting to listen to the shouts in the style of "Grab the thief!" - of those who fill their pockets themselves. Namely, they claim that we have a dictatorship in Slovenia, that we have been a fascist state since March 13th this year. I listen, read and I am amazed. What kind of dictatorship is this when police officers even take photos with political protesters? What kind of dictatorship is this if practically nothing serious happened to any of the protesters, except that the police "touched" the rowdy activist Jaša Jenull according to the usual procedure? What kind of dictatorship is this when a special police department, where the government recently replaced the director, investigates the minister and even detains him? And what kind of dictatorship is it that "the best of journalism" of the public institution RTV Slovenia is carrying out a stubborn rebellion against the government?

Needless to say, all this wave of protests was nowhere to be seen during the previous socialist governments. Probably because they felt comfortable and knew nothing could happen to them. When the former Prime Minister Marjan Šarec directly attacked media freedom and tried to deprive certain media of advertisers, all those who are now sounding off were applauding such ambitions. All right, let them applaud – but, for God's sake, let them not convince us that they themselves are non-party and independent.

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