The human eye can see 'ghost images'

Scientists have discovered that the human eye has a spooky ability. It can detect "ghost images.", reports LiveScience.com. 

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Harvest Moon 2018 Rises Tonight!

Here in the Northern Hemisphere, we call the full moon closest to the autumn equinox the Harvest Moon. Depending on your time zone, 2018’s autumn equinox for the Northern Hemisphere came on September 22 or 23. And the September full moon comes on the night of September 24 for the Americas, and on September 25 for much of the rest of the world. Thus, for the Northern Hemisphere, this upcoming full moon – the full moon closest to our autumn equinox – is our Harvest Moon, Earth Sky reports.

For the Southern Hemisphere, the Harvest Moon always comes in March or April.

Harvest Moon is just a name. In some ways, it’s like any other full moon name. But these autumn full moons do have special characteristics, related to the time of moonrise. Nature is particularly cooperative in giving us full-looking moons near the horizon after sunset, for several evenings in a row, around the time of the Harvest Moon.

What is a Harvest Moon? On average, the moon rises about 50 minutes later each day. But when a full moon happens close to an autumn equinox, the moon rises closer to the time of sunset. For mid-temperate latitudes, it rises only about 30 to 35 minutes later daily for several days before and after the full Harvest moon.

For very high northern latitudes, there’s even less time between successive moonrises.

The difference between 50 minutes and 35 minutes might not seem like much. But it means that, in the nights after a full Harvest Moon, you’ll see the moon ascending in the east relatively soon after sunset. The moon will rise during or near twilight on these nights, making it seem as if there are several full moons – for a few nights in a row – around the time of the Harvest Moon.

So, by all of the natural signs in the heavens, the time of autumn harvest is with us again. The term Harvest Moon traces back to preindustrial times, when farmers — lacking the technology available today — were pressed by the season and welcomed a moonlit week to stretch the shortening daylight hours. Their fields had to be harvested before the farm could be bundled up for the impending winter season. Crops had to be housed. Firewood had to be cut. The daylight hours were rapidly diminishing at this time of year; seemingly, there was not enough time for all the chores that needed to be done in the sun. The Harvest Moon was a welcome lantern in the early evening sky.

This year, it's merely a beautiful late September moon that will provide a series of bright moonlit nights at a time when the seasons are at the turn. The next full moon, on Oct. 24, will be the Hunter's Moon, traditionally touched with frost and framed in the glorious colors of autumn leaves.

The seasons march on. Summer wanes and comes to its end with this weekend's waxing moon.

And HERE is a beatiful sing about Harvest Moon by Neil Young.

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Why Do Book Pages Turn Yellow Over Time?

If you look at old newspaper clippings, aging paper documents and books that are past their prime, you'll notice that they likely have a yellow tinge. But why do old paper products turn this golden hue?

How familial DNA trapped a murderer for the first time

The pioneering technique used to identify a British widow's sadistic killer has led to hundreds of crimes being solved around the world, BBC News reports. How was familial DNA searching used to catch a murderer for the first time, 15 years ago, and more recently the suspected Golden State Killer?

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(VIDEO) Huge 1000ft spider web appears overnight on a beach in Greece

An Enormous and terrifying spider web has sprung up in Greece overnight, covering everything from trees to shrubs near a lagoon.

A video shows the web’s thick blanket cloaking trees, bushes and shrubberies near the shore, with a quick shot of two spiders that appear to be mating.

The region’s high temperatures have formed ideal conditions for the spiders, who quickly transformed the shrubbery into a mating den to have their own “party”.

An increase in the mosquito population is also thought to have contributed to a large number of spiders in the region.

The rapid creation of such webs is said to be unusual, but not completely unheard of.

Video HERE.

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Mother mistakes dynamite for candle during power outage

Authorities say a Connecticut woman mistook a stick of dynamite for a candle during a power outage and suffered severe hand injuries, Fox reports. 

Assistant Bridgeport Fire Chief Michael Caldaroni says the woman was looking to light a candle in her home at about 9:30 p.m. Thursday after the power went out during a storm.

The dynamite went off in the woman's hand.

One of her children called 911 and she was taken to the hospital. No one else was injured.

Caldaroni says one of the home's windows was blown out.

Firefighters found another explosive device in the home and as a precaution, evacuated people in the homes on either side of the woman's residence and called the state police bomb squad to remove it.

The woman's name wasn't released.

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